Archive for ‘Magazine’

February 11, 2012

Small Flowers Crack Concrete

Credit: Fashion Gone Rogue

 Mirte Maas by Hugh Lippe for Russh #44

Mirte looks so very pretty in the February issue of Russh.  There is a dreamy romanticism to her editorial that feels utterly befitting of a February issue.  And Mirte looks exceptionally pretty with natural makeup and softly mussed hair.  I love the charmingly rumpled air about her; nothing about this feels too carefully done.  There is something sweetly innocent about the ethereal white lace and light knit styling in spite of the fair amount of skin it exposes.  Mirte comes across more adorable than seductive.  And I love the setting of the dilapidated house as the peeling cracked paint and worn down wooden floorboards provide great contrast to the pristine white pieces.  The air of abandonment to the scenery just adds a sort of romantic frailty to the tone.   Moreover, I like how the varied texture in this editorial create an overall softness rather than adding edge.  I am most certainly picking up this issue when it releases in the US.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

February 9, 2012

The Making of Miranda Kerr

Credit: The Iconophile

 Miranda Kerr by Willy Vanderperre for Industrie Magazine #4

*Warning: There is plenty of nudity in this. As you can see from the feature shot.  If you don’t have the maturity, don’t look. That’s all there is to it.*

Miranda Kerr is gorgeously inhuman.  Even after having a natural birth, the baby weight seemed to have magically melted away.  At any rate, this is an absolutely stunning black and white editorial by Willy Vanderperre.  He really does take some gorgeous shots.  The shadows to this are really lovely, and I love the intriguing silhouettes showcased here.  And while this is an entirely nude editorial, there is nothing obscene about it.  Anyone who tries to interpret this as pornography is just being silly.  But I’ll get off of my soapbox about the interpretation of any sort of nudity in the United States now.  Read my thoughts on the Vogue Paris 2011 Calendar if you want more on that.

Actually, I didn’t find this sexual at all.  Obviously, a naked Miranda Kerr is plenty sensual, but rather than being “sexy,” I found her nudity reassuringly natural.  While she clearly has a healthy (and well deserved!) confidence about her body, the tone to this editorial radiates with innocence.  It could be her youthful wide-eyed look most of the time, but nothing in  this feels overtly sexual.  From an artistic standpoint, Miranda has some spectacular lines and curves to her body.  She has gorgeous arch to her back, allowing her to create the delightful pose above.  I find that it is the little things that I am attracted to: the arch of her foot in shot 6, the bend of her elbows in shot 2 (above), or the shadows contouring her cheekbones in shot 3.  Overall, this is very tastefully done.  As to be expected of Industrie  Magazine.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

September 8, 2011

Madone

Credit: Fashion Gone Rogue

 Abbey Lee Kershaw by Sebastian Kim for Numéro #126

Oh so very Abbey.  She always does well in pieces with more…mythical concepts and elaborate styling.  With her doll-like looks, there is something otherworldly about her print work.  And while her delicate features may mistakenly cast her as the damsel-in-distress, Abbey always brings the edge required for haute couture.  No piece or look ever wears her; her personality and charisma shines in every shot.  Top notch, that one, as some would say.  And certainly, this sort of styling isn’t exactly my cup of tea at times, but Abbey pulls it off so well.  She has this ability to convey softness even while being absolutely fierce. It has been a while since I’ve seen Abbey in an editorial, and I am hoping that that won’t be the case for the next one.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

September 8, 2011

Glam Moments

Credit: Fashion Gone Rogue

Eniko Mihalik by Anthony Maule for Numéro #126

Oh Numéro…I can’t imagine why I have abandoned you for so long.  This editorial is full of all the flair and throw back sultriness I have been missing.  Eniko is glorious in this, conveying both sensuality and sophistication.  That is something I have always loved about Eniko; every piece she does is injected with seduction and sexuality.  She has this look in her eye that just draws you in.  Moreover, she infuses it with a dose of elegance and glamour, making her perfect for high fashion.  There is always a avant garde feel to her modelling.  In this case, the sixties inspiration is clearly conveyed with the heavily lined eyes and mod prints.  Eniko gives a wonderful line in every shot with elaborate arches and delicately curved fingers.  I can be fascinated by the most minute details as Eniko cleverly adjusts her angles to best showcase the look.  Every shot is full of character and glamour–everything haute couture should embody.

[Perhaps the paragraph above demonstrates why I don’t post Numéro editorials very often.  I am so enamored with the piece at hand that I ramble about a particular detail and the editorial as a whole alike.  Terribly sorry for the incoherence.  Will clean up later.]

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

August 30, 2011

L’ange

Credit: Fashion Gone Rogue

 Daphne Groeneveld by Peter Lindbergh for Numéro #126

It’s been a while since I’ve posted a Numéro editorial, but I like the composition to this.  Peter Lindbergh is one of the last of the great photographers and one who chooses to shoot exclusively in film.  I can’t help but be charmed by his work.  Not to mention, the angelic salvation concept is intriguing; this feels a bit darker than what we’d normally associate angels with.  In some ways, it feels like Pascal Greggory is protecting Daphne rather than the other way around.  And while the beach is normally a bright summery setting, the sand adds a grittiness to this and grounds the more ethereal parts.  This isn’t my favorite piece of work, but there’s something interesting about it nonetheless.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

August 3, 2011

Nowhere Else!

Credit: Fashion Gone Rogue

Aymeline Valade by Will Davidson for Russh #41

Boy do I love this girl.  She has the potential to be a real force in this industry.  Along with real charisma, she has a rather lovely and expressive face I find–really striking.  Moreover, I think that everything she does is fantastic.  This editorial no different.  It is full of flair and personality.  While she is excellent at giving avant garde edge, she appears perfectly at ease with charming playfulness as well.  I like the overall mood to this editorial.  The pieces chosen reflect that joyful fun quite well; they’re very nicely thought out.  Then again, I have always been a bit partial to a neutral palette.  The mix of feminine romanticism and tailored menswear is also lovely.  [I totally want those oxfords.]  Coupled with Will Davidson’s photography, this makes for an exceptionally lovely piece in general.   And a most excellent reflection of the summer/autumn transition period.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

August 1, 2011

Freida Pinto by Mert & Marcus

Credit: Fashion Gone Rogue

Freida Pinto by Mert & Marcus for Interview August 2011

God this is gorgeous…aside from the stupid red paint stripe poorly photoshopped onto a portion of the shots that is.  It is quite unfortunate as this is some of the best I’ve seen from Mert & Marcus.  Every shot speaks for itself.   I love the classic feel to it and how they keep things interesting with the use of shadow.  And that red washed shot is most certainly something special.  Freida, of course, looks breathtakingly stunning throughout.  This kind of quality is what I have come to expect from Interview Magazine. I hope it stays that way.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

May 26, 2011

Kate the Now

Credit: Fashion Gone Rogue

 Kate King by Benny Horne for Russh #40

At first, I almost passed this editorial over for being too plain.  But then, for some reason, I kept coming back to it in spite of its “plainness.”  Stevie Dance always crafts these seemingly ordinary concepts that end up intriguing me more than I would have originally thought.  She is really good at making the ordinary something more.   More impressively, she’s gotten me intrigued about a shoot that largely features an all-denim look (an aesthetic I certainly don’t advocate for).  In general, I like Kate King.  She is an interesting newcomer who had walked a fair amount of shows for Fashion Month Fall 2011 and just recently landed Dolce & Gabbana Campaign.  There’s also something pleasant about her personality in this.  She doesn’t try too hard to seem cool or make this editorial edgy and slick.  However, she does know when to simply turn it on, which is something most newcomers don’t intuitively get.  I particularly enjoyed shots 2 and 8 for the sentiment.  This is a lovely start to her career.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

May 18, 2011

Saskia de Brauw by Ben Toms

Credit: Fashion Gone Rogue

Saskia de Brauw by Ben Toms for Dazed & Confused June 2011

Hello there Dazed & Confused.  I always really enjoy its editorials.  And Saskia is quite lovely and dramatic in this deeply printed styling.  I love the darker color scheme as well.  I’m not normally a fan of prints; they feel a little too flamboyant for my tastes.  Not to mention prints are normally accompanied by a neon color scheme.  This is deeper without feeling muted.  The sense of fun from the prints is well retained.  Oh, and those Balenciaga spikes get me every time; I will forever be in love with those I think (at least I hope so!).  Saskia always a more androgynous look, giving the more feminine pieces a different feel.  While she does have a tendency to put her hand on her hip, I kind of really love the haphazard way in which she places her limbs.  It’s a little doll-like, perhaps adding more of a story to a rather ordinary concept.  I also like how the texture of the background works to complement the prints.  This is a great little piece that I highly enjoyed.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

April 18, 2011

Supersize Me

Credit: Mode Photography

Valerija Kelava & Chloe Memisevic by Craig McDean for Interview April 2011

So many epically dramatic shots…I had a difficult time choosing the one feature shot for this editorial.  For all the volume of the styling and the wildness of the hair, something about this still seems really well tailored.  Maybe not so much in a strict disciplined sense, but there’s still polish to this despite the flair of wild abandon.  Not to mention it takes good design technique for voluminous pieces not to overwhelm the frame of the body.   Moreover, there’s an off-kilter quirkiness to this editorial that I really really like.  From the stark stare to the gangly stride, there is most certainly something odd about it.  It should feel off-putting, but there’s an odd gracefulness to it all.  And there’s still this innate sense of cool throughout.  That quintessential visceral characteristic fashion so often strives to capture.

Fashion is frequently about exaggerated escapism.  This editorial gives me just that in the most delightful fashion.  Actually, this is what I love about Interview Magazine.  It presents this pop art quirkiness in a highly unique way.  Moreover, the photography is superb.  Craig McDean uses contrast to his advantage, making me really notice the texture of the shot [does that even makes sense?].  The black and white shots could feel classic with a muted softness; instead there’s a clean sharpness to some of the lines and an entirely modern feel (perhaps a bit futuristic as well) to the enlarged proportions.  Bravo to McDean for a really eye-catching piece.  And for making me remember my love for Interview Magazine.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.