Altuzarra Fall 2011

Credit: Vogue.com

Certainly a looser silhouette for Joseph Altuzarra, but definitely still sexy.  The looks were well-layered while riffing off the nineties grunge style movement.  There was also a Vivienne Westwood-eque Britich punk flavor to some of the prints and structuring, of which I think Joseph successfully incorporated into his own style.   And the beauty was gorgeous, if a little heavy for day-time.  Very Westwood-esque as well.  Honestly, I don’t know quite know why many in the industry are heralding this collection as realistic fall weather; I would be freezing my ass off if I wore these looks as is in November.  Moreover, I feel that a good portion of nineties fashion should have stayed there.  The minimalist movement was an excellent revival in times of economic hardship, but that was really more about the quality of the craftsmanship than the parred down simplicity aesthetic.  And really dresses over pants?  We’re doing that again?  I know that Richard Chai is attempting to revive that one, but I don’t think he’ll be successful in that endeavor.  As someone once put it, the nineties were “the era that taste forget” (I think it was Hadley Freeman in The Meaning of Sunglasses).

However, for all the nineties influx throughout his collection, Altuzarra does present well contrasted sheer silk printing; coupled with the heavier fur or parka, they really stood out with feminine sensuality.   By placing heavy prints onto light summer dresses with sheer paneling, he even made me enjoy tartan print.  And I guess the grunge era had to get something right style-wise; Joseph took the concept of paradoxes from it.  He recrafted recent fashion history (oh how this industry loves to do that) into his own aesthetic for fall 2011.  Plenty of layering hardly seemed heavy at all, while his girl’s sensuality is retained throughout each look.  So I’ll give him that.  Though, after viewing his good friend Alexander Wang’s showing, this left me wanting a bit more from Altuzarra.

I didn’t like a good portion of this collection, but if you’d like to view the rest of the collection, see here.

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